Rare Quotes by Henry Clay Dominant Figure in the Whig Party

Most of the Henry Clay Quotes are on passion, character, mankind, which are pointing to the human Advice, experience, wisdom. Find out the best quotes by  Former United States Senator Henry

  • I had rather be right than be President.
  • Statistics are no substitute for judgment.
  • Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must.
  • All legislation is founded upon the principle of mutual concession.
  • Honor and good faith and justice are equally due from this country toward the weak as toward the strong.
  • Of all the properties which belong to honorable men, not one is so highly prized as that of character.
  • The time will come when winter will ask what you were doing all summer.
  • How often are we forced to charge fortune with partiality towards the unjust!
  • The gentleman cannot have forgotten his own sentiment, uttered even on the floor of this House, Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must.
  • All religions united with government are more or less inimical to liberty. All, separated from government, are compatible with liberty.
  • I have no commiseration for princes. My sympathies are reserved for the great mass of mankind ….
  • Political parties serve to keep each other in check, one keenly watching the other.
  • I have heard something said about allegiance to the South. I know no South, no North, no East, no West, to which I owe any allegiance.
  • A man must be a born fool who voluntarily engages in controversy with Mr. Adams on a question of fact. I doubt whether he was ever mistaken in his life.
  • I always have had, and always shall have, a profound regard for Christianity, the religion of my fathers, and for its rights, its usages and observances.
  • An oppressed people are authorized whenever they can to rise and break their fetters.
  • There is no power like oratory. Caesar controlled men by exciting their fears, Cicero by . . . swaying their passions. The influence of the one perished; that of the other continues to this day.
  • I am not, sir, in favor of cherishing the passion of conquest. I am permitted … to indulge the hope of seeing, ere long, the new United States, (if you will allow me the expression,) embracing not only the old ….
  • Precedents deliberately established by wise men are entitled to great weight. They are evidence of truth, but only evidence…But a solitary precedent…which has never been reexamined, cannot be conclusive.
  • Government is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees; and both the trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people.
  • Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.
  • The Constitution of the United States was made not merely for the generation that then existed, but for posterity—unlimited, undefined, endless, perpetual posterity.
  • If you wish to avoid foreign collision, you had better abandon the ocean.
  • A nation’s character is the sum of its splendid deeds; they constitute one common patrimony, the nation’s inheritance. They awe foreign powers, they arouse and animate our own people.
  • The imposition of taxes has its limits. There is a maximum which cannot be transcended. Suppose the citizen to be taxed by the general government to the utmost extent of his ability, or a thing as much as it can possibly bear, and the state imposes a tax at the same time, which authority is to take it?
  • By competition the total amount of supply is increased, and by increase of the supply a competition in the sale ensues, and this enables the consumer to buy at lower rates. Of all human powers operating on the affairs of mankind, none is greater than that of competition.
  • The time will come when winter will ask you what you were doing all summer.
  • All legislation, all government, all society is founded upon the principle of mutual concession, politeness, comity, courtesy; upon these everything is based…Let him who elevates himself above humanity, above its weaknesses, its infirmities, its wants, its necessities, say, if he pleases, I will never compromise; but let no one who is not above the frailties of our common nature disdain compromises.
  • Impart additional strength to our happy Union.?Diversified as are the interests of its various parts, how admirably do they harmonize and blend together!?We have only to make a proper use of the bounties spread before us, to render us prosperous and powerful.
  • Let him who elevates himself above humanity . . . say, if he pleases, “I will never compromise”; but let no one who is not above the frailties of our common nature disdain compromise.
  • We have had good and bad Presidents, and it is a consoling reflection that the American Nation possesses such elements of prosperity that the bad Presidents cannot destroy it, and have been able to do no more than slightly to retard the public’s advancement.
  • Whether we assert our rights by sea, or attempt their maintenance by land whithersoever we turn ourselves, this phantom incessantly pursues us. Already has it had too much influence on the councils of the nation.
  • The colors that float from the masthead should be the credentials of our seamen. There is no safety to us, and the gentlemen have shown it, but in the rule that all who sail under the flag (not being enemies) are protected by the flag.
  • In a scheme of policy which is devised for a nation, we should not limit our views to its operation during a single year, or even for a short term of years. We should look at its operation for a considerable time, and in war as well as in peace.
  • The great advantage of our system of government over all others, is, that we have a written constitution, defining its limits, and prescribing its authorities; and that, however, for a time, faction may convulse the nation, and passion and party prejudice sway its functionaries, the season of reflection will recur, when calmly retracing their deeds, all aberrations from fundamental principle will be corrected.
  • Government is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees. And both the trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people.
  • I cannot believe that the killing of 2,000 Englishmen at New Orleans qualifies a person for the various difficult and complicated duties of the Presidency.
  • The Constitution of the United States was made not merely for the generation that then existed, but for posterity- unlimited, undefined, endless, perpetual posterity.
  • The measure of the wealth of a nation is indicated by the measure of its protection of its industry; the measure of the poverty of a nation is marked by the degree in which it neglects and abandons the care of its own industry, leaving it exposed to the action of foreign powers.
  • In all cases where incidental powers are acted upon, the principal and incidental ought to be congenial with each other, and partake of a common nature. The incidental power ought to be strictly subordinate and limited to the end proposed to be obtained by the specified power. In other words, under the name of accomplishing one object which is specified, the power implied ought not to be made to embrace other objects, which are not specified in the constitution.